jekyllian

jekyllian:

This is the one song everyone
would like to learn: the song
that is irresistible:

the song that forces men
to leap overboard in squadrons
even though they see the beached skulls

the song nobody knows
because anyone who has heard it
is dead, and the others can’t remember.

Did you know it’s National Poetry Month? Got any female-written sci-fi, spec-fi, or fantasy poems to share?

powells

powells:

taherehmafi:

ransom and i got married several months ago in an intimate ceremony, but recently had a larger reception for more family and friends, and it was a blast! as we’re both writers, it seemed fitting to have the event at one of our favorite bookstores: the last bookstore in downtown LA. we’ve had a lot of requests for photos, so i thought i’d drop a few here. hope you enjoy them as much as we do! 

:::for the especially curious:::

my bouquet: was made from the pages of ransom’s novel (miss peregrine’s home for peculiar children).

our photographers: brandon + katrina of brandon wong photography.

venue: the last bookstore in downtown los angeles.

catering: the extremely fabulous heirloomla.

flowers: from floral art!

rentals: furniture from found rentals, dishes from dishwish!

the band: one of our favorite local indie bands, the gallery.

hugs and books!

xx

tahereh

World’s most writer-ly wedding!

themarysue

comixology:

Every Friday, were going to try to bring you a brief guide on a different comic book character or story, because we all know the world of comics can be a confusing place, and we want to help.

There seems to be a lot of fans of Wonder Woman here on Tumblr, but if you’ve been wanting to find out more about Diana Prince, Themyscira, and The Amazons, we humbly present to you:

A comiXology Guide to Wonder Woman!

Fierce, bold, and confident, Diana, Amazon Warrior Princess of Themyscira, is both feared and respected by the denizens of the DC Universe. 

Wonder Woman’s first appearance came in 1941 within the pages of All Star Comics #8 but her origins really were developed in the early issues of DC’s Sensation Comics. In these classic comics, you see the introduction of some of WW’s best known tools like the Invisible Jet and her Magic Lasso. In May 1942, only 5 months after her first appearance, Wonder Woman was the star of her own solo comic.

If all you want is one must-read example of a great modern take on Wonder Woman, look no further than gailsimone's story, The Circle, which brings the heroine face-to-face with talking gorilla warriors, neo-nazis, and the vulnerability of being powerless.

Finally, the rebooting of the DCU with The New 52 saw the combining of comic legends Brian Azzarello and cliffchiang bringing their much acclaimed talents to the Wonder Woman comics. While the New 52 has seen its share of successes and failures, Wonder Woman has consistently been one of the brightest stars in the new universe.  

stsathyre

experimentaltimeorder:

afrofuturistaffair:

Books on Science Fiction and Black Speculative Critical Analysis

1. The Black Imagination: Science Fiction, Futurism and the Speculative (Black Studies and Critical Thinking) (2011) by Sandra Jackson - This critical collection covers a broad spectrum of works, both literary and cinematic, and issues from writers, directors, and artists who claim the science fiction, speculative fiction, and Afro-futurist genres.

2. Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film (2008) by Adilifu Nama - The first book-length study of African American representation in science fiction film, Black Space demonstrates that SF cinema has become an important field of racial analysis, a site where definitions of race can be contested and post-civil rights race relations (re)imagined.

3. Race in American Science Fiction (2011) by Isiah Lavender III - Race in American Science Fiction offers a systematic classification of ways that race appears and how it is silenced in science fiction, while developing a critical vocabulary designed to focus attention on often-overlooked racial implications. These focused readings of science fiction contextualize race within the genre’s better-known master narratives and agendas.

4. Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from 1890s to Present (2011) by Robin Means Coleman - Horror Noire presents a unique social history of blacks in America through changing images in horror films. Throughout the text, the reader is encouraged to unpack the genre’s racialized imagery, as well as the narratives that make up popular culture’s commentary on race. Offering a comprehensive chronological survey of the genre, this book addresses a full range of black horror films, including mainstream Hollywood fare, as well as art-house films, Blaxploitation films, direct-to-DVD films, and the emerging U.S./hip-hop culture-inspired Nigerian “Nollywood” Black horror films.

So basically Im bout to spend all the money on the books Ive sold so far, on these books. Needs alla this.

ericafailsatlife

ericafailsatlife:

I’m sure by now you’ve all heard about the runaway freight train that is the Smut Peddler 2014 Kickstarter. If not, here’s the short of it. Smut Peddler 2014 is an anthology of pornograhic comics created by women, for everyone. The Kickstarter doubled it’s goal on the first day and more or less ran out of special tiers IMMEDIATELY. So, I did the above piece for the Smut Peddler portfolio ($95 tier) which gets you the pdf, the book and 10 limited edition prints by 10 artists.

I wanted to do a gender reversed Frazetta image. Although, everyone up there is wearing more clothing than Frazetta ever drew. At least on the fantasy pieces, anyway.

Anyway, Smut Peddler! Click on it!